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5 Common Problems With Your Pool's Pump | Slater Pumps

  • By Brendon Johnson
  • 05 Apr, 2017

The most important component of any pool is its pump. Without the pump, the pool would simply become stagnant, full of scum and entirely gross and unhygienic. When your pool's pump stops functioning correctly, you need to fix the problem before using the pool again. Luckily, usually the problem falls under one the following five categories.

1. Not Pumping Water

If you notice that your pool's pump doesn't pump or move any water, check the pump baskets first and ensure that the lint pot lid is airtight.. Then check the skimmer to make sure it's empty. Generally, over a period of time mud gathers there and restricts water flow.

After checking the pump baskets and skimmer, check the impeller motor shaft are free to rotate. leaves and other debris will clog or jam it. If neither of these tricks work, the suction line could have a small air leak.

2. Sucking Air

Though a pool pump’s purpose is to suck water, air has less mass. This means that air moves easier than water, so if the pump can suck air, it will. Small leaks in your pump’s system on the suction side will allow the pump to suck air instead of water and the pump performance will be significantly degraded.

Pump leaks are somewhat common, but they aren’t a big deal unless they’re given the opportunity to grow. Typically, leaks occur around the mechanical seal, (between pump and motor) or valves and fittings on suction side.

The easiest way to find pump mechanical seal leaks is to check under the pump for moisture, when pump is running. Seals usually leak trying to prime the pump and beginning to pump. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

3. Leaking Water

If your pump leaks water, the leak will be evident on what’s know as the ‘pressure side’. There are a number of reasons your pump could leak water.

Leaks can occur due to shrunken threads or bad thread sealant, as well as bad O-rings in the impeller housing or faulty shaft seal. If it’s a seal or the O-ring, it’s probably best to replace every seal at the same time. If you go this route, the repair could cost less than buying them one at a time. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

4. Loud Noise

There are typically two types of noises your pump could make. You may hear a rattling that makes it sound like your pump has rocks in it, or you might hear what sounds like high-pitched screaming.

If the noise is a rattling, the pump might be loudly vibrating on the surface the pump sits on. You can solve this problem with a rubber mat. Put the mat underneath the pump and see if the noise stops.

If that’s not it, the problem could be what’s called cavitation. Cavitation occurs when the pump can’t get enough water or when it is drawing air during the priming process. Getting rid of foreign matter and debris in the skimmer and suction strainer and any blockages in suction pipe could solve this issue.

A screaming noise, on the other hand, can indicate worn, corroded or old bearings. While new bearings are fairly inexpensive, installation labour can be rather intensive and you should probably leave it to a pumping professional. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

5. Motor Not Working

If the motor simply doesn’t work, it’s probably an issue with the power. Check the power supply, voltage and electricity. If the pump has plenty of power, then the problem could be the capacitor. Listen to the motor to see if you can hear a humming sound.

On the other had, if the motor runs for a while and then turns off, it could indicate an overheating issue. The problem could also be, however, that the motor’s fan failed or a vent has become clogged by leaves, dirt and other debris. Clear the vents of any debris. You can also buy a motor cover to keep sunlight from heating it up too much. Air ventilation is always required.

The problem could also be, however, that the motor's fan failed or a vent became clogged by leaves, dirt and other debris. Clear the vents of any debris. You can also buy a motor cover to keep sunlight from heating it up too much.

If you’re still unable to pinpoint the problem or you’re not sure how to fix it, call a pump professional. They’ll be able to diagnose and repair the problem with relative ease.

To resolve motor or electrical issues it is imperative that the work is done by a qualified electrical professional for safety reasons. Slater Pumps can support these issues either infield or client carry into Workshops.

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By Brendon Johnson 26 Oct, 2017

One of the most vital components of any swimming pool is a filter. Without a quality filter, your pool will become dirty and stagnant and would be full of all kinds of debris and dirt, making it somewhere that no one would want to swim in.

 

When it comes to having a pool that people want to swim in, hygiene should always be your utmost priority. After all, dirty water has the potential to make people very sick, which is why knowing how to keep your pool clean by combining a high-quality pool filtration system and the right cleaning chemicals is so important.

 

Both of these two components – pool filters and cleaning chemicals – need to work in perfect harmony with one another. Otherwise, one has to compensate for the other. Many pool filters that are fitted to pools are actually too small for the swimming area in question and because of this, they under perform. That’s why ensuring that your pool filter is large enough for your pool is so crucial.

 

When it comes to ensuring that your swimming pool is clean and clear, as well as appealing to swim in, having a good filtration system in place is vital. So if your filter is under performing or has broken down completely, you need to be selective when it comes to choosing a new one.

 

What are the pool filter types on offer?

 

There are three main types of pool filters; these are Cartridge Pool Filters, Diatomaceous Filters and Sand Pool Filters. Different people and different areas of the world tend to have different preferences, which is why it can be so difficult choosing the right pool filter for your pool. Many pool specialists believe that the suitability of pool filters is to do with the size of the pool, rather than how the filter itself works. One filter is not seen as being of a higher quality than other filters; it’s just that certain filters work better for different sized pools. Wondering what makes each filter so effective? To give you a better idea, below we have explained how each filter works and what makes each an effective option.

 

Cartridge Pool Filters : Of all filter types, Cartridge Pool Filters have the highest capacity and is a hybrid of the two other filter types. This filter has the simplest design; water is pumped into the tank and then forced past polyester pleats, with the dirt becoming trapped in the layers of polyester. This filter can collect dirt down to 15 microns, which isn’t as high as the DE Filters, but is higher than the levels offered by Sand Pool Filters.

 

Diatomaceous Filters : Also known as DE Filters, these filters are known for giving pools the cleanest water of all three filter types as it is able to filter out even the finest particles of dirt. This filter mostly uses the exoskeleton of algae (diatomaceous earth) and tends to work quite well, as long as the filter is large enough for the pool. In instances where the pool is large, using a larger filter is recommended. DE Filters can filter dirt down to 5 microns, making it the most effective filter option there is on the market, but has the disadvantage of moderate extra operational maintenance by pool owners.

 

Sand Pool Filters : Of all the pool filter types, Sand Pool Filters are the easiest to use and most popular. They operate in a very basic way, but despite this, they are incredibly effective. Pool water is pumped through the system with the sand within it catching any dirt and debris, cleaning the water. The more tightly packed the sand is, the more effective the filter will be. The sand used in these filters is specially graded sand that has the ability to trap tiny particles of dirt and bacteria – this is the lowest maintenance pool filter there is and one of the most effective too. This filter can remove particles down to 25 microns, perhaps somewhat higher than the other two filter types. However, this is still one of the most effective pool filters there is on the market.

 

When do they need changing, cleaning or improving?

 

Cartridge Pool Filters : This filter only requires cleaning on a regular basis as required. Usually this is when the pressure gauge shows that there has been a pressure increase. To clean the filter, you simply have to remove the cartridge and wash off any dirt and debris with a hosepipe. Occasionally, it is recommended that each component of the filter is soaked in a specialist cleaner for at least 12 hours.

 

Diatomaceous Filters : This filter is cleaned via backwashing when the system states that it has an added pressure increase. Once the filter has been backwashed, forcing dirt and debris out of it, new diatomaceous earth must be added to it, to make the filter functional again. Occasionally it is recommended that the filter membrane pads are coated in a specialist cleaner for at least 12 hours.

 

Sand Pool Filters : Like Cartridge Pool Filters, Sand Pool Filters are more effective when they are slightly dirty, so over cleaning them can be detrimental to how they function. These filters are cleaned via backwashing on a regular basis, when pressure rise occurs. The filter is set to back wash, which blasts the sand clean and removes any dirt and debris from it. These filters are the easiest to use and maintain and are overwhelmingly the most popular.


When it comes to how you can determine when a pool filter needs changing or replacing, that depends on how well it is functioning. If you notice that your pool isn’t as clean as it normally is, this is a sign that something isn’t right and that your pool filter needs maintenance or attention.

 

If you aren’t sure if your pool filter needs to be replaced or repaired, then it’s best to contact the experts, to ensure that your pool is kept in the best condition possible and is as clean and free from bacteria as it can be.

 

Slater Pumps can provide advice and support on request.

By Brendon Johnson 11 Oct, 2017

When it comes to choosing the type of pump you need for your pool you need to be careful. Swimming pool pumps aren’t one-size-fits-all. In fact, there are many different types of pool pumps out there for all sorts of different purposes. However, pool pumps are essential for keeping your pool hygienic and free from dirt.

Here are some of the different types of pool pumps out there, helping you to decide which type of pool pump you should get for your particular setup.

 

Variable-Speed Pool Pump

When thinking about what pool pump you should get, it’s important to think about how you’ll be using it.

One type of popular pool pump is the variable-speed. As the name implies, this pump can work faster or slower depending on the conditions. In other words, as the owner, you get to determine the flow rate –

the rate at which water passes through the filter. Compared to single-speed pumps, variable pumps offer users the ability to adjust the amount of electricity they use, potentially saving you money in the long term. Although the setup costs are usually slightly higher, thanks to the overall complexity of the design, variable-speed pumps will often save you money in the long term, if used correctly. Slater Pumps have a wide range of variable-speed pool pumps for all applications.

Dual-Speed Pumps

Although variable speed pumps might offer a lot of speed settings, the majority of pool owners won’t use them all. In fact, what most people need is a pump with just a high and a low setting, depending on the conditions. The low setting is just for keeping the pool ticking over and the water fresh. The high setting is suited for pool parties or when using water features. Just like the variable speed pump, dual-speed pumps help to reduce the costs of running a pool by adjusting to demand. Slater Pumps stock the Davey range of dual-speed pumps and also support all other major brands.

 

Single-Speed Pumps

Single speed pool pumps are the most affordable option for most pool owners, but not necessarily in the long term. Although the units themselves are remarkably cheap, costs can rise in the long run because they are always operating at high speed. Running at high speed makes them very efficient, but also means that they drain a lot of energy, potentially increasing your electricity bills. Slater Pumps stocks of fixed-speed pumps are selected and supported to satisfy clients performance and duty requirements with multiple options in stock.

 

 

Which Motor Design Should You Choose?

In addition to pump speed, modern motor designs on pool pumps incorporate a variety of energy saving and noise reduction designs. Slater Pumps stock and recommend the Davey Silencor fixed-speed water cooled pumps and Davey Promaster variable-speed water cooled pumps for best efficiency and energy saving.

 

What Size Pump Should You Choose?

The final consideration is one of size: how large should your pump be? If you choose a pump that’s too small for your pool, you’ll cause the motor to wear out and it’ll die prematurely. Ideally, you need to choose a pump that has the capacity to circulate all the water in your pool every 6-8 hours, but factors such as filter type and size, together with other duties (water falls and solar heating, etc) should also be considered when sizing your pool pump.

 

Slater Pumps can provide advice and support on request and have a wide range of options stocked for quick supply.

By Brendon Johnson 24 May, 2017

The most important component of any pool is its pump. Without the pump, the pool would simply become stagnant, full of scum and entirely gross and unhygienic. When your pool's pump stops functioning correctly, you need to fix the problem before using the pool again. Luckily, usually the problem falls under one the following five categories.

1. Not Pumping Water

If you notice that your pool's pump doesn't pump or move any water, check the pump baskets first and ensure that the lint pot lid is airtight.. Then check the skimmer to make sure it's empty. Generally, over a period of time mud gathers there and restricts water flow.

After checking the pump baskets and skimmer, check the impeller motor shaft are free to rotate. leaves and other debris will clog or jam it. If neither of these tricks work, the suction line could have a small air leak.

2. Sucking Air

Though a pool pump’s purpose is to suck water, air has less mass. This means that air moves easier than water, so if the pump can suck air, it will. Small leaks in your pump’s system on the suction side will allow the pump to suck air instead of water and the pump performance will be significantly degraded.

Pump leaks are somewhat common, but they aren’t a big deal unless they’re given the opportunity to grow. Typically, leaks occur around the mechanical seal, (between pump and motor) or valves and fittings on suction side.

The easiest way to find pump mechanical seal leaks is to check under the pump for moisture, when pump is running. Seals usually leak trying to prime the pump and beginning to pump. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

3. Leaking Water

If your pump leaks water, the leak will be evident on what’s know as the ‘pressure side’. There are a number of reasons your pump could leak water.

Leaks can occur due to shrunken threads or bad thread sealant, as well as bad O-rings in the impeller housing or faulty shaft seal. If it’s a seal or the O-ring, it’s probably best to replace every seal at the same time. If you go this route, the repair could cost less than buying them one at a time. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

4. Loud Noise

There are typically two types of noises your pump could make. You may hear a rattling that makes it sound like your pump has rocks in it, or you might hear what sounds like high-pitched screaming.

If the noise is a rattling, the pump might be loudly vibrating on the surface the pump sits on. You can solve this problem with a rubber mat. Put the mat underneath the pump and see if the noise stops.

If that’s not it, the problem could be what’s called cavitation. Cavitation occurs when the pump can’t get enough water or when it is drawing air during the priming process. Getting rid of foreign matter and debris in the skimmer and suction strainer and any blockages in suction pipe could solve this issue.

A screaming noise, on the other hand, can indicate worn, corroded or old bearings. While new bearings are fairly inexpensive, installation labour can be rather intensive and you should probably leave it to a pumping professional. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

5. Motor Not Working

If the motor simply doesn’t work, it’s probably an issue with the power. Check the power supply, voltage and electricity. If the pump has plenty of power, then the problem could be the capacitor. Listen to the motor to see if you can hear a humming sound.

On the other had, if the motor runs for a while and then turns off, it could indicate an overheating issue. The problem could also be, however, that the motor’s fan failed or a vent has become clogged by leaves, dirt and other debris. Clear the vents of any debris. You can also buy a motor cover to keep sunlight from heating it up too much. Air ventilation is always required.

The problem could also be, however, that the motor's fan failed or a vent became clogged by leaves, dirt and other debris. Clear the vents of any debris. You can also buy a motor cover to keep sunlight from heating it up too much.

If you’re still unable to pinpoint the problem or you’re not sure how to fix it, call a pump professional. They’ll be able to diagnose and repair the problem with relative ease.

To resolve motor or electrical issues it is imperative that the work is done by a qualified electrical professional for safety reasons. Slater Pumps can support these issues either infield or client carry into Workshops.

By Brendon Johnson 03 May, 2017

Many people spend large amounts of time and effort into sterilising and filtering their mains water household supply. However, they rarely make the same efforts in filtering and maintaining their water tank and water tank pump for continuous, reliable, clean and safe tank water supply.

Water tank maintenance is fairly simple as long as you rely on experienced water pump technicians for assistance. When you practice proper maintenance for your water tank, you can enjoy adequate water pressure and cleaner water.

Here are a few common problems and solutions for water tank pumps that Slaterpumps can help you with.

    Problems

Most water tank pumps experience some issues throughout their lifetime. Some of these problems you can resolve on your own, while other problems require an experienced pump technician to repair.

If you notice any of the following problems, contact Slaterpumps for support and service.

Reduced Water

If your water pump runs but doesn’t deliver water, there may be a fault within the pump. Pump impellers and seals may fail and foreign matter and debris from the tank can clog the pump internals. Low water levels in the tank can also cause run dry failure.

Stopped Pump

If your pump/motor system stops running you may have an electrical fault or foreign matter seizure. These problems are often economically repairable. Call Slaterpumps for service and support.

Short Cycles

One of the most common problems with water tank pumps is shortened cycles. If you notice your pump used to run for longer amounts of time and has recently started to run shorter or more rapid cycles, call Slaterpumps for service and support.

Short cycles are often the result of faults within the pumps auto pressure control or often are an indication of leaky pipes or taps. Over their lifetime too many stops and starts will limit the reliability of the pressure control and the pump.

If your water tank pump experiences any of these issues, you will likely lose water pressure or the water supply to your home. Do your best to resolve problems with your water pump quickly to prevent further issues to your water tank supply.

If your water tank pump experiences any of these issues, you will likely lose water pressure or the water supply to your home. Do your best to resolve problems with your water pump quickly to prevent further issues to your water tank.

Solutions

Always rely on an experienced pump technician to resolve all water pump problems. When you call a technician, he or she will determine the cause of the problem and then resolve the issue.

Here are few possible solutions that your pump technician may recommend.

Regulate Cycles

Some pumps with a standard pressure switch control allow you to set a desired pressure range to best suit your requirements and reduce your cycling rate.

Other pumps with an electronic pressure control are not adjustable, but monitor both pressure and flow and provide “run dry protection”.

Pumps that run continuous and never shut off are more likely to incur internal damage. Slaterpumps can provide support and service to address and resolve these issues.

Water tank pumps that stop running at random times often have overheating issues. Pumps with an internal thermal overload switch will automatically turn off when the pump exceeds a safe temperature. The pump will then start cycling again after it has cooled down. This fault is usually caused by issues such as bearing seizure, tight rotation. low voltage supply, winding failure or rapid cycling.

If you experience any of these problems with your water tank pump, trust Slaterpumps to resolve any problems.

By Brendon Johnson 19 Apr, 2017

Have you ever looked out your window in the middle of the winter and wished you could go swimming? Does it break your heart when the temperature drops and you have to put your swimsuit back in storage? What you need is a pool heater.

Numerous types of pool heaters exist, all with their strengths and weaknesses. In this blog we’ll discuss what you should consider when deciding on your priorities as well as the pros and cons of different types of heaters and naturally Slater Pumps can supply advice & support and we market all types of pool heaters to best suit your needs.

What Are Your Priorities?

In a perfect world there would be a pool heater that heats fast and reliably, is inexpensive, makes no noise, is environmentally friendly, needs very little maintenance and is easy to install. Unfortunately, pool owners must determine which of the following characteristics to prioritise.

Heats Fast and Consistently

Most pool heaters can warm an entire pool, but not all of them can do so quickly. Some pool heaters take a significant time to heat the water. Some heaters may not have a fully consistent power source, so will not have a consistently ideal temperature.

Inexpensive

Obviously, for a more inexpensive heater you’re going to have to give up some other things. If you’re looking to spend less money in the long run (less energy and maintenance costs), you’re going to have to put in more money to purchase the heater. If you choose a heater that costs less to begin with, you may end up spending more later on.

Noise Issues

Your neighbourhood may have a noise restriction or you may want to ensure your pool area stays relaxing and peaceful. Some heaters include fans, pumps or motors that all produce noise. On the other hand, electric heaters can produce no noise at all. Most heaters require water recirculation to and from the pool and the main filter pump or heater recirc pump will exhibit some noise.

It’s important to ensure that your heater is the proper size for the size of your pool. A heater that’s too large will use more energy for no reason, while a heater that’s too small will have to work overtime to heat the whole pool.

What Type of Heater Do You Need?

There are four main different types of pool heaters on the market. When choosing the type you want, consider your priorities.

Solar

Solar’s most obvious benefit lies in the low energy costs and lack of negative impact on the environment and usually are installed on roof top locations. Of course during the winter months the amount of sun available will be more limited, but generally a solar heating system will extend the pool season beyond summer and during spring. A solar heating system is usually powered by the pool filter pump, but sometimes a booster pump is required for high roof top installations.

Electric Element

An electric element heater has a low purchase cost, installs easily and takes up little space. However, they’re best for spas or hot tubs as they don’t heat up larger pools efficiently. This means your energy costs go up.

Electric Heat Pump

The electric heat pump option is the most energy efficient option for those who want year-round pool access. For extended seasons or year-round operation, electric heat pumps represent a fantastic choice for low energy costs. They do heat the water at a slower pace and cost more initially, but they boast more long-term benefits than some other options.

Gas

Gas heaters are perfect for reliable, fast and consistent heat on demand. The purchase cost is moderate, but they do require a suitable independent gas supply, usually natural gas or LPG dependent on the local market. When combined with a companion solar heating system as well, running costs are minimised and you may not necessarily need to give up being environmently friendly.

Talk to Slater Pumps Footscray about your pool’s size and your needs and we will be able to help you determine which heater is best for you.

By Brendon Johnson 05 Apr, 2017

The most important component of any pool is its pump. Without the pump, the pool would simply become stagnant, full of scum and entirely gross and unhygienic. When your pool's pump stops functioning correctly, you need to fix the problem before using the pool again. Luckily, usually the problem falls under one the following five categories.

1. Not Pumping Water

If you notice that your pool's pump doesn't pump or move any water, check the pump baskets first and ensure that the lint pot lid is airtight.. Then check the skimmer to make sure it's empty. Generally, over a period of time mud gathers there and restricts water flow.

After checking the pump baskets and skimmer, check the impeller motor shaft are free to rotate. leaves and other debris will clog or jam it. If neither of these tricks work, the suction line could have a small air leak.

2. Sucking Air

Though a pool pump’s purpose is to suck water, air has less mass. This means that air moves easier than water, so if the pump can suck air, it will. Small leaks in your pump’s system on the suction side will allow the pump to suck air instead of water and the pump performance will be significantly degraded.

Pump leaks are somewhat common, but they aren’t a big deal unless they’re given the opportunity to grow. Typically, leaks occur around the mechanical seal, (between pump and motor) or valves and fittings on suction side.

The easiest way to find pump mechanical seal leaks is to check under the pump for moisture, when pump is running. Seals usually leak trying to prime the pump and beginning to pump. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

3. Leaking Water

If your pump leaks water, the leak will be evident on what’s know as the ‘pressure side’. There are a number of reasons your pump could leak water.

Leaks can occur due to shrunken threads or bad thread sealant, as well as bad O-rings in the impeller housing or faulty shaft seal. If it’s a seal or the O-ring, it’s probably best to replace every seal at the same time. If you go this route, the repair could cost less than buying them one at a time. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

4. Loud Noise

There are typically two types of noises your pump could make. You may hear a rattling that makes it sound like your pump has rocks in it, or you might hear what sounds like high-pitched screaming.

If the noise is a rattling, the pump might be loudly vibrating on the surface the pump sits on. You can solve this problem with a rubber mat. Put the mat underneath the pump and see if the noise stops.

If that’s not it, the problem could be what’s called cavitation. Cavitation occurs when the pump can’t get enough water or when it is drawing air during the priming process. Getting rid of foreign matter and debris in the skimmer and suction strainer and any blockages in suction pipe could solve this issue.

A screaming noise, on the other hand, can indicate worn, corroded or old bearings. While new bearings are fairly inexpensive, installation labour can be rather intensive and you should probably leave it to a pumping professional. Slater Pumps can solve this issue for you.

5. Motor Not Working

If the motor simply doesn’t work, it’s probably an issue with the power. Check the power supply, voltage and electricity. If the pump has plenty of power, then the problem could be the capacitor. Listen to the motor to see if you can hear a humming sound.

On the other had, if the motor runs for a while and then turns off, it could indicate an overheating issue. The problem could also be, however, that the motor’s fan failed or a vent has become clogged by leaves, dirt and other debris. Clear the vents of any debris. You can also buy a motor cover to keep sunlight from heating it up too much. Air ventilation is always required.

The problem could also be, however, that the motor's fan failed or a vent became clogged by leaves, dirt and other debris. Clear the vents of any debris. You can also buy a motor cover to keep sunlight from heating it up too much.

If you’re still unable to pinpoint the problem or you’re not sure how to fix it, call a pump professional. They’ll be able to diagnose and repair the problem with relative ease.

To resolve motor or electrical issues it is imperative that the work is done by a qualified electrical professional for safety reasons. Slater Pumps can support these issues either infield or client carry into Workshops.

By Brendon Johnson 22 Mar, 2017

If your backyard plays host to a pool, you are not alone. Millions of homeowner’s dreams of hosting weekend pool parties and engaging in aqua-aerobics in the comfort of their own backyard have been realized.

For many pool owners, having a pool is a dream come true-until they forget one crucial element of pool ownership: Maintenance.

Proper pool maintenance is vital to avoid contaminated, discoloured water, algae build-up, damaged filters and failed pumps. If you stay on top of weekly, monthly and annual pool chores, you won’t ever have to hesitate when your friends invite themselves over for an impromptu pool party. Avoid major clean-ups and keep your backyard pool in prime condition with these helpful and surprisingly simple pool maintenance tips.

Skim and Scrub

If large trees shade your pool, skimming the surface should be part of your daily routine. Wake up every morning and head out to your pool to skim leaves off of the surface of the water. If leaves or other debris lay at the bottom of your pool, you may consider investing in a robot vacuum or other automatic vacuum equipment to do the work for you. Slater Pumps can provide advice and equipment on request.

In addition to skimming the surface, it's important to scrub the sides of your pool every other week. Weekly scrubbing sessions will eliminate algae build-up and ensure your pool water doesn't turn green.

Automatic Salt Water Chlorinators can be equally effective in maintaining chlorine levels and inhibiting algae growth.

Skimmer

Your pool’s filter removes impurities from the water and keeps your pool clean. Your pool pump sucks up dirt, leaves or other bits of debris on a daily basis, which means you should be emptying you skimmer basket at least once a week.

To clean out the skimmer, do the following:

  • Acidity/alkalinity. The PH level of your pool should be kept between 7.5 and 7.8 to prevent irritation and erosion.
  • Calcium hardness. The appropriate level of calcium hardness should fall between 220 and 350 to prevent plaster damage.
  • Cyanuric acid. The ideal reading for cyanuric acid should ideally be between 30 and 50 to protect the chlorine level.
  • Total alkalinity. The alkalinity level helps to keep PH levels in balance and should fall between 60 and 120.

Remember to maintain the correct level of free chlorine, which is a sanitizer meant to keep your pool water free of germs. An Automatic Salt Water Chlorinator can be equally effective and far more convenient in maintaining chlorine levels and inhibiting algae growth. Slater Pumps can provide advice and equipment on request.

Balance Chemicals

Maintaining proper chemical balance is one of the most important factors in pool maintenance. Imbalanced chemical levels may cause pool water discolouration or lead to skin and eye irritability.

Test your pool water once a week and keep a log of these four chemical levels:

  • Turn the filter off
  • Remove the filter cap (usually located on pool deck)
  • Lift out filter basket and remove debris into trash bin

If you fail to clean out your filter basket at regular intervals, over time the filter will fail to do its job properly.

Schedule Professional Service

Although it may seem like you can handle pool maintenance on your own, it’s important to involve a professional service once a year to ensure all mechanical equipment – the pumps and filter system are in working order.

Before you schedule an appointment, inspect your pool equipment for any damage or potential problems. Take note of leaks, holes, loud sounds or odd smells. If you notice your pool pump is malfunctioning, don’t hesitate to contact Slater Pumps to repair or service your pump and filter.

By Brendon Johnson 08 Mar, 2017

Your home spa offers a great space to socialise, get low-impact exercise and relax. But for your spa to function correctly, it relies on a complex pump and electrical system. This system provides you with heating, jets, lighting and filtration.

One of the most important spa components is your pump. When a spa pump becomes old, damaged or glitchy, it can cause problems with even the most fundamental spa system tasks.

While some pump damage responds to repairs or part exchanges, many pump issues require full replacement. In this blog, we list five signs that it’s time to consider spa pump repair or replacement.

1. Abnormal Sounds

One of the first signs of a worn or ageing pump is a change in its sound. While you likely hear some pump noise while using your spa, you should have the pump checked if the noise increases or changes suddenly.

Humming noises without any water flow, often indicates pump seizure or electrical faults and rumbling or squealing noises when running indicates bearing failure.

2. Decreased Water Pressure

Your pump’s main function is to force water flow in the desired direction to produce a particular effect, such as with high-pressure jets. When the pump becomes inefficient you may notice lower water pressure.

Before considering replacement, inspect your pump visually for any debris. Occasionally, debris may block the impeller and affect water movement. If you don’t see any debris, the decrease in water pressure likely stems from damage or wear and tear to the pump.

Slaterpumps can provide service and repair support without the need for total replacement in most circumstances.

3. Pump or Motor Failure

To work properly your spa pump and motor must operate efficiently in tandem, together with your spa controller and heating system and touch pad controls if fitted.

If you switch on the pump, but nothing happens you may have a pump issue or controller issue, but either way it most likely demonstrates an electrical fault. Electrical faults should always be resolved by an experienced and qualified electrical service person and Slaterpumps can provide service and support on request.

Sometimes if the motor runs but there is no water flow there may be air trapped in the pump casing or pipework, especially if you have recently drained or refilled your spa. Follow your spa pool owners manual instructions to address air lock issues.

If you can’t get the pump or motor to operate or there appears to be an internal electrical or pump or motor fault, have a qualified spa professional assess the issue. Slaterpumps can provide service and support on request.

4. Leaking Water

Your spa relies on a plumbing system and an electrical system working in tandem. Unfortunately, when these systems become damaged, neither may work. If water leaks from your pump or the surrounding pipework, it can cause electrical failure.

If you notice leaking water around your pump, turn off all your equipment for electrical safety. Then check your pump and pipework for source of leaks and resolve the issue swiftly to avoid electrical failure. Slaterpumps can provide service, support and advice on request.

5. Spa Controller Error Messages

Spa pump and motor problems can lead to more than just a change in water flow.

If you have a digital display spa controller or touchpad, you may get an error message relating to water temperature or heater failure or control system failure, when faults occur.

Error messages vary with brand and model of controller, but invariably tend to relate to an electrical fault of one sort or another. For safety reasons it is important to address those electrical problems swiftly when they occur and imperative to employ a suitably qualified and experienced electrical serviceman. Slaterpumps can assist and support you on request.

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